Discussion:
gnulib Compressed HTML help
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Gisle Vanem
2017-10-29 14:23:44 UTC
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Maybe a bit off-topic, but I've created a Compressed HTML-file from the
doc/*.texi files. Using this makefile snippet:

TEXI2HTML ?= py -3 f:/ProgramFiler/Python36/Tools/scripts/texi2html.py

gnulib.chm: gnulib.texi
-mkdir output
$(TEXI2HTML) -H gnulib $< output
hhc gnulib.hhp

(hhc is from MS's HTML Workshop).

I've tried the GNU-official Texi2HTML v5 package too. But since that
doesn't generate any .hhp/.hhc files, I settled on the texi2html.py script.
Anyone know a better way?

Only problem with texi2html.py is that it does not convert these Texi
commands:
@env{foo}
@option{foo}
@command{foo}
into sensible HTML tags. Those should perhaps be translated into
<code> or <pre> tags?

And I failed to find any more recent than this:
https://svn.python.org/projects/python/trunk/Tools/scripts/texi2html.py

FYI, I've uploaded the gnulib.chm here:
http://www.watt-32.net/misc/gnulib.chm

BTW, .chm-files can also be viewed in the excellent KchmViewer
(on non-Windows too):
http://www.ulduzsoft.com/linux/kchmviewer/getting-kchmviewer/
https://sourceforge.net/projects/kchmviewer/files/kchmviewer/7.7/
--
--gv
Bruno Haible
2017-10-29 16:22:16 UTC
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Hi Gisle,
Post by Gisle Vanem
Maybe a bit off-topic, but I've created a Compressed HTML-file from the
doc/*.texi files.
My first (uninformed) reaction would have been: What's the point of using
a different format than the widely used and standardized HTML?

The answer is: When I use it with kchmviewer, it provides fast scrolling
through the (huge) TOC, a search index, and a fast search facility.
Which is not built-in into browsers and is often emulated with slow JavaScript.

It is also viewable in 'okular', but it shows a funny page numbering :-)
Gisle Vanem
2017-10-29 17:03:05 UTC
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Post by Bruno Haible
The answer is: When I use it with kchmviewer, it provides fast scrolling
through the (huge) TOC, a search index, and a fast search facility.
Which is not built-in into browsers and is often emulated with slow JavaScript.
Agreed.
Post by Bruno Haible
It is also viewable in 'okular', but it shows a funny page numbering :-)
The last page is 692 according to the pdfEtex output.
Some bug in okular? I'll check it out.
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--gv
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